Jazmina Cininas
Erzsébet was frequently mistaken for a vampire  (2011)reduction linocutedition: 20image 37.0 x 28 cmpaper: 43 x 34.3 cm
AUD $1100.00Erzsébet (Elizabeth) Bathory was a 16th century Hungarian noblewoman who spent the last four years of her life bricked-up within a set of rooms in her castle in Čachtice, Slovakia. Legend has it that Erzsébet tortured and killed 600 virgins for the purpose of bathing in their blood in the belief that it kept her skin beautiful, and that she was followed around by a she wolf. Indeed some have speculated that the three ‘prongs’ that form the letter ‘E’ in her seal represent wolf’s teeth. Erzsébet is mentioned in Sabine Baring Gould’s “The Book of Werewolves” (1865) and it is quite possible that her story played some part in the creation of Bram Stoker’s “Dracula”. Certainly since the nineteenth century she has been much more closely aligned with vampirism - an alignment which is reinforced by her nickname “The Blood Countess” - despite her lycanthropic ‘origins’.The model for my Erzsébet is Julie Delpy, who not only played the Hungarian noblewoman in the 2009 film, “The Countess”, but also played the female werewolf Serafine Pigot in the (generally appalling) 1997 film, “An American Werewolf in Paris”.


I love Jazmina Cininas’s work. She is an amazing relief print artist.

Jazmina Cininas

Erzsébet was frequently mistaken for a vampire  (2011)
reduction linocut
edition: 20
image 37.0 x 28 cm
paper: 43 x 34.3 cm


AUD $1100.00

Erzsébet (Elizabeth) Bathory was a 16th century Hungarian noblewoman who spent the last four years of her life bricked-up within a set of rooms in her castle in Čachtice, Slovakia. Legend has it that Erzsébet tortured and killed 600 virgins for the purpose of bathing in their blood in the belief that it kept her skin beautiful, and that she was followed around by a she wolf. Indeed some have speculated that the three ‘prongs’ that form the letter ‘E’ in her seal represent wolf’s teeth. 

Erzsébet is mentioned in Sabine Baring Gould’s “The Book of Werewolves” (1865) and it is quite possible that her story played some part in the creation of Bram Stoker’s “Dracula”. Certainly since the nineteenth century she has been much more closely aligned with vampirism - an alignment which is reinforced by her nickname “The Blood Countess” - despite her lycanthropic ‘origins’.

The model for my Erzsébet is Julie Delpy, who not only played the Hungarian noblewoman in the 2009 film, “The Countess”, but also played the female werewolf Serafine Pigot in the (generally appalling) 1997 film, “An American Werewolf in Paris”.

I love Jazmina Cininas’s work. She is an amazing relief print artist.